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The Virginia magazine of history and biography

596 Pages · 2013 · 26.37 MB · English

  • The Virginia magazine of history and biography

    Digitized by the Internet Archive


    2013


    in


    http://archive.org/details/virginiamagazine13bruc ALLENCOUNTtPUBLICLIBRARY


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    THE


    Cy^


    VIRGINIA MAGAZINE


    OF


    HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.


    Published Quarterly by


    THE VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY,


    FOR


    THE YEAR ENDING JUNE, 1906.


    VOLUME


    XIII


    Richmond, Va:


    HOUSE OF THE SOCIETY,


    No. 707 East Franklin St. PUBLICATION COMMITTEE.


    ARCHER ANDERSON,


    MEREDITH,


    C. V.


    VALENTINE,


    E. V.


    EDWARD WILSON JAMES,


    Rev. W. MEADE CLARK.


    Editor ofthe Magazine.


    WILLIAM STANARD.


    G.


    WM. ELLIS JONES, PRINTER,


    RICHMOND, VA. Table of Contents.


    Book Reviews 329, 447


    Buchanan, James, How made President. Reminiscences of John


    A. Parker 81


    Carriage Owners in Gloucester County, Va., 1784. Communicated


    by Edward Wilson James, Norfolk, Va 313


    Corbin Papers, The 51


    Council and General Court Records, Notes from 389


    Fredericksburg. Va., Gazette, 1787-1803, Memoranda from 425



    Genealogy Brooke 100, 223, 445


    Brent . . .105, 219, 318, 435


    Mallory 216, 324, 44r


    Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries 9r, 209, 425


    History in its Relation to Literature. An Address before the


    Annual Meeting of the Virginia Historical Society by Prof. W.


    P. Trent, Columbia University 473


    Hungars Church, Northampton County, Va. By Thos. B. Robert-


    son, Eastville, Va. 315



    Illustrations General Roger Elliott, 96a; Effigies of John Brent


    and Wife, 110a; Cossington Rectory, 112a: Cossington Lodge,


    112a; Wickins, near Charing, Kent, 222a; Hungars Church,


    314a; Charing Church, Kent, 322a; Hutton Conyers, Yorkshire, 324a


    Jones, John Paul, Letter to Joseph Hewes 87


    King William Parish, Vestry Book of, 1707-1750. Translated from


    the French and Edited by Prof. R. H. Fife, Wesleyan Univer-


    sity • 65, 175, 265


    Logg's Town, Treaty of, 1752 143 IV TABLE OF CONTENTS.


    Meade, Richard Kidder, letter of 409


    Revolutionary Army Orders, for a main army under Washington,


    1778-1779 • 337


    Virginia in 1639-40. From English Public Record Office 375


    Virginia Gleanings in England. By Lothrop Withington, of Lon-


    don, England, and H.T. Waters, ofMassachusetts, 55, 191, 303, 402


    Virginia and the Catawbasand Cherokees,ATreatyBetween, 1756, 225


    Virginia and the Cherokees, &c, The Treaties of, 1768 and 1770. . . 20


    Virginia, Early Westward Movement of, 1722-34. Council Orders.


    Edited by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C. J, 113, 281, 351


    Virginia Legislative Papers, 1774-75 36, 411


    Virginia Militia in the Revolution 16, 206


    Yeardley, Governor Sir George, and Council, Commission to,


    March 14, 1625-6 298 t)*


    THE


    Magazine


    Virginia


    OF


    HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.


    Vol. XIII. JULY, 1905. No. 1.


    THE EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF


    VIRGINIA,


    1722-1734.


    As Shown by the Proceedings of the Colonial Council.


    Edited and Annotated by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C.


    Nov. 5, 1724.


    On reading this day at the Board Sundry Depositions taken


    before the Justices of Spotsylvania County against a Saponie


    Indian named Sawnie lately return'd from Canada, whereb]'


    it appears that the said Indian did behave himself very inso-


    lently threatening the Inhabitants with a speedy Incursion of


    the French Indians,1 and the said Indian being examined in


    *It is probable that the Indians concerned in this affair belonged to


    the Five Naions. Certain tribes living in Canada were largely under


    the influence of this confederacy, but it does not seem possible that


    they would be permitted to penetrate so far to the south through terri-


    tory entirely within the jurisdiction of the Iroquois.


    At this date the Saponi Indians were living at Fort Christanna,


    Brunswick county, Va. Their original habitat was on the Yadkin river


    in Western North Carolina, near the base of the Blue Ridge. Theywere


    driven from this place about the year 1703 by the Iroquois. (Byrd, 2 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE.


    Council did acknowledge that he was taken by the French In-


    dians, and carried into Canada about two years ago. That


    he had been with the said French Indians in an Incursion on


    the people of New England but that last Summer he was per-


    mitted to go to Albany in company with some of the said


    French Indians, from whence by the Favour of Capt. Collins


    [and] the Officers of the Fort there, he had liberty to return


    to Virginia and the said Indian alledg'd whatever he said


    ;


    at Germanna in the County of Spotsylvania was spoken whilst


    he was in Drink. And being examined if he brought any mes-


    sage from the French Indians to the Saponies or any other of


    the Tributarys or if he intended to return to Canada as he


    had formerly given out, he deny'd both, But forasmuch as


    it appears to this Board that the said Indian hath by his


    speeches & actions given just cause of Suspicion of his ill In-


    tentions It is Ordd that he be committed to prison there to


    remain until farther Orders unless the Great Men of his Na-


    tion shall engage for his good behavior, and that he shall not


    depart out of this Government or hold correspondence with


    any Foreign Indians. And the Interpreter is directed to sig-


    W


    nify to the Saponie Nation the. Terms upon ch they may


    have the said Indian delivered to them.


    May


    4th, 1725.


    The Governor communicating to the Council the advices he


    has received that on the 26th of last month divers Indians


    plundered the Quarters of Mr. John Taliaferro near the great


    History of the Dividing Line, 1728, p. 8.) About 1740 they removed


    from Virginia to Pennsylvania and settled at Shamokin, which is the


    present site of Sunbury. (Mooney, The Sioitan Tribes of the East,


    Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, 1894, pp. 50-


    51.) They were finally adopted by the Cayuga tribe and removed to


    New York. The Saponi were described as "the honestest and bravest


    Indians Virginia ever knew." A later Council Order seems to indicate


    that at least a portion of the tribe went south and joined the Catawbas.


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