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Soul Economy

378 Pages · 2016 · 1.64 MB · English

  • Soul Economy




    SOUL ECONOMY


    BODY, SOUL, AND SPIRIT


    IN WALDORF EDUCATION




    [XII]


    THE FOUNDATIONS OF WALDORF EDUCATION




    RUDOLF STEINER


    SOUL ECONOMY


    BODY, SOUL, AND SPIRIT


    IN WALDORF EDUCATION


    Lectures presented in Dornach, Switzerland


    December 23, 1921 – January 5, 1922


    V


    Anthroposophic Press


    Published by Anthroposophic Press


    P.O. Box 799


    Great Barrington, MA 01230


    www.steinerbooks.org



    Translated with permission by Roland Everett from Rudolf Steiner, Die gesunde


    Eniwickelung des Leiblich-Physischen als Grandlage der freien Enrfalrung des Seelisch-Geistigen (GA


    303) copyright © 1977 Rudolf Steiner–Nachlassverwaltung.


    Revised edition by Anthroposophic Press, copyright © 2003


    Introduction by William Jensen copyright ©2003


    Publication of this work was made possible by a grant from


    THE WALDORF CURRICULUM FUND


    All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without the


    written permission of the publishers, except for brief quotations embodied in critical


    articles and reviews.


    ISBN 0-88010-517-8


    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data


    Steiner, Rudolf, 1861–1925.


    [Gesunde Entwicklung des Leiblich-Physischen als Grundlage der freien Entfaltung des


    Seelisch-Geistigen. English]


    Soul economy : body, soul, and spirit in Waldorf education / Rudolf Steiner.


    p. cm. — (The foundations of Waldorf education ; 12)


    “Lectures presented in Dornach, Switzerland, December 23, 1921–January 5, 1922.”


    Includes bibliographical references and index.


    ISBN 0-88010-517-8 (alk. paper)


    1. Steiner, Rudolf, 1861–1925 — Views on education. 2. Waldorf method of education.


    3. Anthroposophy. I. Title. II. Series.


    LB775.S7G4713 2003


    370'.1 — dc21


    2003006511


    Printed in the United States of


    America


    10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1




    CONTENTS


    Editor’s Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii


    Introductory Note by Rudolf Steiner . . . . . . . . . . . ix


    1. The Three Phases of the Anthroposophic Movement


    December 23, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


    2. Education Based on Knowledge of the Human Being, part 1


    December 24, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14


    3. Education Based on Knowledge of the Human Being, part 2


    December 25, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31


    4. Education Based on Knowledge of the Human Being, part 3


    December 26, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48


    5. Health and Illness, part 1


    December 27, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66


    6. Health and Illness, part 2


    December 28, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82


    7. Children before the Seventh Year


    December 29, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101


    8. The Waldorf School


    December 30, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117


    9. Children from the Seventh to the Tenth Years


    December 31, 1921 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135


    10. Children in the Tenth Year


    January 1, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155



    11. Children from the Tenth to the Fourteenth Years, part 1


    January 2, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175


    12. Children from the Tenth to the Fourteenth Years, part 2


    January 3, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194


    13. Adolescents after the Fourteenth Year


    January 4, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214


    14. Esthetic Education


    January 5, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231


    15. Physical Education


    January 6, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249


    16. Religious & Moral Education


    January 7, 1922 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268


    Appendix: Questions & Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 The


    Foundations of Waldorf Education . . . . . . . . . 331 Rudolf Steiner’s


    Lectures and Writings on Education . . . . 333


    Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337




    EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION


    William Jensen


    Rudolf Steiner presented more than twenty lecture courses on


    education and child development, each taking a somewhat


    different approach to the introduction of his insights and


    pedagogical methods. The important lectures in this volume


    were presented in Dornach, Switzerland, to leading educators,


    including many from England, led by Professor Millicent


    Mackenzie, a pioneer in education from Cardiff University. As


    a result of these talks, Steiner


    went to Oxford, England, later


    that year, where he expanded on


    many of the themes begun in


    these lectures.1


    The setting for these lectures


    was the White Hall in the first


    Goetheanum, where, because of


    the large attendance and limited


    space, the audience was split into


    two groups. Each lecture was


    presented twice, first to the


    German speakers and then to those who


    had traveled from England and Speaker’s rostrum in the White Hall



    1 . Those lectures took place also under the guidance of Professor Mackenzie;


    they are contained in The Spiritual Ground of Education (Anthroposophic Press,


    2003), GA 305.



    Holland. The repeated second sessions are represented in this


    volume. Consequently, in these lectures Steiner was speaking


    mostly to English-speaking educators, many of whom were


    relatively new to the ideas of spiritual science.


    He begins by describing the development and movement of


    anthroposophy as the necessary foundation for understanding


    the principles behind Waldorf education. Again and again, he


    states the need to understand the human being as a whole and


    emphasizes the importance of basing all education on a deep


    knowledge of children as continually developing beings of


    body, soul, and spirit — an approach Steiner refers to in these


    talks as “soul economy.” From this perspective, any


    enlightened approach to education is always based on the


    teacher’s ability to observe and respond to each stage of a


    child’s development. This method considers the critical


    importance of doing the right things at the right times as each


    stage of a child’s life unfolds. It also takes into account each


    child’s unique temperament. In a very real sense, then,


    Steiner’s approach does not present methods for the


    education of children; it shows us how to educate individuals


    as whole human beings.


    During the discussion periods that followed a couple of


    these lectures, Steiner responded to questions and expanded


    on certain themes, including his views on the state of the


    Waldorf education and the anthroposophic movement in


    general. He presented these lectures with the great hope that


    his ideas on education would soon be understood and


    practiced well beyond Central Europe, bringing with them a


    lively impulse for social and spiritual renewal in the world.




    INTRODUCTORY NOTE


    Rudolf Steiner


    Before the conference began, Rudolf Steiner addressed the participants


    gathered in the White Hall of the Goetheanum:


    Ladies and Gentlemen, before beginning this lecture course,


    allow me to bring up an administrative matter. Originally, this


    course was meant for a smaller group, but it has drawn such a


    response that it has become clear that we cannot gather in this


    tightly-packed hall. It would be impossible, and you would


    soon realize this if you were to attend both the lectures and


    the translations. Consequently, I have decided to present the


    lectures twice — the first each day at ten A.M. and again at


    eleven, for those who wish to hear it translated into English.


    For technical reasons this is the only way to proceed.


    Therefore, I will begin the earlier lectures exactly at ten and


    second at eleven o’clock. I will ask those who came from


    England, Holland, and Scandinavia to attend the later lectures


    and everyone else to attend the first.2



    2 . Only the repeated lectures were recorded in shorthand. They was presented


    in two or three parts, each followed by George Adams’s English translations.


    The text of this edition (apart from a few slight revisions) follows the version


    provided by Marie Steiner for its initial publication.



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