2

Complementary & Alternative Medicine for Mental Health

272 Pages · 2016 · 2.53 MB · English

  • Complementary & Alternative Medicine for Mental Health



    Complementary & Alternative Medicine for


    Mental Health


    ©2016 Mental Health America


    Updated April 8, 2016


    TREATMENTS


    Click on any item to go directly to the summary


    CDP choline Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oil)


    Chromium Rhodiola


    Cranial Electrical Stimulation St. John’s wort


    DHEA and 7-keto DHEA S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM-e)


    Folate Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation


    Ginkgo biloba Tryptophan/5-HTP


    Inositol Valerian


    Kava (Piper methysticum) Wellness


    Meditation Yoga


    Melatonin



    LIST OF CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SIDE EFFECT RISK LEVELS


    uf06e = GENERALLY SAFE


    uf06e = MINOR TO MAJOR SIDE EFFECTS


    uf06e = CAUTION ADVISED


    Click on GO to go directly to the summary for that item


    DEPRESSION


    uf0b7 Chromium for atypical depression GO>


    uf0b7 Cranial Electrical Stimulation for depression GO>


    uf0b7 DHEA and 7-keto DHEA for depression and bipolar disorder GO>


    uf0b7 Folate for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of conventional antidepressants GO>


    uf0b7 Inositol for depression GO>


    uf0b7 Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oil) for mood stabilization and depression and to


    enhance the effectiveness of conventional antidepressants GO>


    uf0b7 Rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) for mild to moderate depression GO>


    uf0b7 St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) for mild to moderate depression GO>


    uf0b7 S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM-e) for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of


    conventional anti-depressants GO>


    uf0b7 Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for depression GO>


    uf0b7 Tryptophan/5-HTP for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of conventional


    antidepressants GO>


    uf0b7 Wellness GO>


    uf0b7 Yoga for depression and schizophrenia GO>


    ANXIETY, STRESS, PANIC DISORDER, AND OTHER CONDITIONS


    uf0b7 Cranial Electrical Stimulation for anxiety GO>


    uf0b7 Inositol for panic disorder GO>


    uf0b7 Kava (Piper methysticum) for anxiety and stress GO>


    uf0b7 Meditation for all forms of stress GO>


    uf0b7 Rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) for stress GO>


    uf0b7 Tryptophan/5-HTP for anxiety GO>


    uf0b7 Wellness GO>


    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    uf0b7 Yoga for anxiety, PTSD and ADHD GO>



    SLEEP DISORDERS


    uf0b7 Cranial Electrical Stimulation for sleep disorders GO>


    uf0b7 Melatonin for jet lag and sleep disorders GO>


    uf0b7 Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) for sleep disorders GO>


    uf0b7 Wellness GO>


    NEUROPROTECTION


    uf0b7 CDP choline as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 Folate as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oil) as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 Rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM-e) as a possible neuroprotectant GO>


    uf0b7 Wellness GO>




    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA


    CAM FOR MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS (2012)



    A COMPARATIVE EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO


    COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT


    FOR MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS


    12



    1 Although some of the sources are later in time, reflecting publication in 2013, the information in this outline is


    current as of December, 2012. Mental Health America cannot and does not undertake any obligation to keep the


    information current after that date.


    2 WIKICITATION: MHA does not have the resources to exhaustively check all citations and cross-references in this


    outline, and new evidence may make existing citations obsolete at any time. Accordingly, readers are encouraged


    to correct citations and update information on the listed treatments by sending e-mail to


    [email protected]


    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    CONTENTS



    MIND-BODY MEDICINE


    WELLNESS:


    LIVE YOUR LIFE WELL



    BIOLOGICALLY-BASED PRACTICES



    MOOD DISORDER TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 chromium for atypical depression


    uf0b7 DHEA and 7-keto DHEA for depression and bipolar disorder – CAUTION ADVISED


    uf0b7 folate for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of conventional antidepressants


    uf0b7 inositol for depression


    uf0b7 omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oil) for mood stabilization and depression and


    to enhance the effectiveness of conventional antidepressants


    uf0b7 rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) for mild to moderate depression


    uf0b7 S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM-e) for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of


    conventional anti-depressants


    uf0b7 St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) for mild to moderate depression


    uf0b7 tryptophan/5-HTP for depression and to enhance the effectiveness of conventional


    antidepressants




    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    ANXIETY TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 kava (Piper methysticum) for anxiety and stress -- CAUTION ADVISED


    uf0b7 inositol for panic disorder


    uf0b7 rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) for stress


    uf0b7 tryptophan/5-HTP for anxiety



    SLEEP DISORDER TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 melatonin for jet lag and sleep disorders


    uf0b7 valerian (Valeriana officinalis) for sleep disorders



    COGNITION DISORDER TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 CDP choline as a possible neuroprotectant


    uf0b7 Folate and other B vitamins as a possible neuroprotectant


    uf0b7 ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) as a possible neuroprotectant


    uf0b7 omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oil) as a possible neuroprotectant


    uf0b7 rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) as a possible neuroprotectant


    uf0b7 S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM-E) as a possible neuroprotectant




    ELECTRICAL AND MAGNETIC FIELD TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 Cranial Electrical Stimulation for substance use rehabilitation, depression, anxiety, and


    sleep disorders


    uf0b7 Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for depression



    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents



    MIND-BODY TREATMENTS


    uf0b7 yoga for depression, anxiety, PTSD, ADHD, and schizophrenia


    uf0b7 meditation for all depression, anxiety, and PTSD




    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



    This outline has been developed by Mental Health America (MHA) from the principal available


    evidence-based sources of information concerning “complementary,” “alternative,”


    “integrative,” “natural,” and often self-administered treatments for mental health conditions.


    Mental Health America acknowledges the generous assistance of David Mischoulon, M.D.,


    Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who has reviewed the


    manuscript, but who bears no responsibility for the information, which is derived mainly from


    published sources. Syntheses and evaluations of the information by MHA are its responsibility


    alone. MHA also bears complete responsibility for its decisions to shorten and redraft


    descriptions of information from the sources. Only quoted text should be presumed to be


    verbatim.



    SOURCES



    MHA began with the limited information accepted by the National Center for Complementary


    and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality


    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    (AHRQ), at the National Institutes of Health1 and added the information contained in ten recent


    compilations of “complementary and alternative medicine” (hereinafter CAM) for mental


    health disorders: (1) Dr. Mischoulon’s Natural Medications for Psychiatric Disorders:


    Considering the Alternatives, co-edited with Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, M.D. (also of Harvard


    Medical School) (2002/2008),2 (2) How to Use Herbs, Nutrients & Yoga in Mental Health Care,


    by Richard P. Brown, M.D. (of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons), Patricia


    L. Gerbarg, M.D. (of New York Medical College), and Philip R. Muskin, M.D. (of Columbia as


    well) (2009) (“Brown et al.”) ,3 preceded in 2004 by Brown, R.P. and Gerbarg, P.L., The Rhodiola


    Revolution4 and supplemented in 2012 by Non-drug Treatments for ADHD, by Brown, R.P. and


    Gerbarg, P.L.,5 and The Healing Power of the Breath, by Brown, R.P. and Gerbarg, P.L.,6 and in


    2013 by Muskin, Gerbarg and Brown’s latest distillation, Complementary and Integrative


    Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders (“Brown et al. II”)7 [For the purpose of counting, the


    foregoing five books are treated as a single source], (3) The seminal article, “Dietary


    Supplements and Natural Products as Psychotherapeutic Agents,” by Adriane Fugh-Berman,


    M.D. (of Georgetown Medical School) and Jerry M. Cott, Ph.D. (of the National Institutes of


    Health) (1999),8 (4) Complementary and Alternative Treatments in Mental Health Care, By


    James H. Lake, M.D. (clinical assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral


    science at Stanford and visiting assistant professor of medicine at the Center for Integrative


    Medicine, University of Arizona School of Medicine) and David Spiegel, M.D.,9 (5) relevant


    portions of the Natural Standard Herb and Supplement Guide (2010 edition),10 (6) relevant


    portions of Berkeley Wellness Reports – Dietary Supplements (2010 and 2011 editions,


    University of California),11 (7) relevant portions of Consumer Reports, “Dangerous


    Supplements,” published by Consumers Union, September, 2010, at p. 16-20 (2010),12 (8)


    relevant portions of The Mayo Clinic Guide to Alternative Medicine 2011, published by Time


    Home Entertainment, Inc. (2010),13 (9) the compendium by Iovieno, N., Dalton, E. D., Fava, M. &


    Mischoulon, D., “Second-tier Natural Antidepressants: Review and Critique” (2011),14 and (10)


    Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Arizona School of Medicine and


    bestselling CAM and integral health advocate Andrew Weil, M.D.’s relevant book, Spontaneous


    Happiness (2011).15


    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents



    Although not treated as a source, except for the chapter on yoga and meditation, MHA has


    benefitted enormously by guidance from James S. Gordon, M.D., a psychiatrist who runs the


    Center for Mind-Body Medicine in Washington, D.C., and the nuanced approach to recovery


    from mental health conditions that he advocates in Unstuck,16 which describes recovery as a


    spiritual path.


    The quest for mental wellness and recovery from mental and emotional setbacks is


    fundamental to everyone’s path in life. Any search for insight into one’s life purpose, any quest


    for knowledge of the self, must treat mental adversity as an opportunity for growth and for


    enlightenment. That is the spiritual core of the recovery concept. And it is in that spirit that this


    outline is offered, for those on the quest.


    CAM and Mental Health Return to Table of Contents


    Please note: To fully download this free PDF,EBook files you need know All free.
    Found by internet command,site not saved pdf file
You May Also Like

Related PPT Template in the same category.